Monthly Workshop

May review

 

 

On Sunday the 27th of May we held our monthly workshop at the usual venue in Southampton. With an attendance of about a dozen we started as always with a brief introduction and warm up. From here we moved on to our first module of the day; here we looked at variations of common strikes, namely the two handed use of the slap and the palm strike. It has been said that using both hands to strike or punch in a simultaneous fashion has the potential to manifest 3 times the power of the same strike thrown via a single limb. Here we looked at the double slap to the ears or both sides of the neck and at the double palm heel strike to the chin and jaw bone, or as Fairbairn referred to it, the double chin-jab.

 

Isolating the double slap to both sides of the neck and the double chin-jab straight up and under the chin.

 

First we looked at the mechanics of both strikes in isolation and then we combined the double slap with the double palm strike as both a pre-emptive tool and as one employed as a reaction to a sharp shove into a wall, followed by a frontal grab of some kind. We all know the importance of stripping down to the bare essentials in terms of tool selection, but this rainy day variation certainly has its place.

  

Here we see the same combination employed as a pre-emptive attack, followed by the combative use of the environment. In this example via a multiple head smash into the wall.

 

   

Here we employ the same drill in a reactive sense, starting with your eyes closed to trigger the startle response. Partner employs a sharp shove/grab into the wall, hands come up as you counter immediately with the slap/strike combination.

 

 

 

As always priority was placed on impact development, so both strikes were worked on the pads followed by a cross over to partner application…

 

 

The next module up was counter grappling; here we looked at a counter response to the worse case scenario of going to the ground and having to escape from a subject dominated position. Here the focus was on escaping from the mount whilst the subject launches a multiple punching attack. Here we need a default cover as we buck the subject forward, forcing him to base as he must catch his forward decent to the ground. From here we attach and bite uninterrupted, as this creates space, we shove away to regain our feet ASAP.

 

Staying with an escape from the mount, next we looked at dealing with a choking attack, usually more specific to women and tactics of anti-rape. Here we drop the chin and shrug the shoulders to create space to breathe, next we break the subject’s upper body structure bringing the head/face in proximity to our hands for an eye gouge/head twist counter from here we can take the mount to continue the attack, or preferably roll away and regain the feet ASAP.

 

Here is the said sequence in depiction…

We also looked at similar tactics of biting, gouging, ripping and manipulating the throat before the maintenance of main artillery strikes for escapes from the scarf hold as well as the guard position, regardless of whether its text book or as more likely some kind of bastardization for the street…

 

 

Here we see Paul escaping from the scarf hold…and me passing Alban’s guard position…

 

This position manifested itself from a stand up struggle, I end up in Alban’s guard and immediately attack the face, his response is to raise his hips and scissor my waist in order to keep me away…this is where we pass the guard by dropping the elbows into the perennials, hammer the balls…

 

 

Pass the legs to take a side mount then attack the head to finish…

 

The next couple of modules focused on the offensive use of both an edged weapon and an impact weapon. We looked at such things for several reasons, first in order to gain an idea of how such tools might be employed against us and also from a study and research point of view; finally in order to enhance our own Combative functionality it makes sense, that we also gain a competence in the use of weapons. Here we looked at very basic angles of attack with a knife, then at how such lines of attack are bastardized and coupled with deception during common streets attacks. Then finally how someone practiced with a blade might employ the same for an immediate lethal entry. Here we looked at both the Filipino influence as well as some despicable methods employed in U.S prisons known as American jailhouse. Again such subjects were looked at purely for information and study as well as to depict just how such methods would be very difficult to deal with unarmed.

 

 

 

Here we looked at a demonstration of cutting power during a live blade drill…

 

Training blade pad reaction drill…

Integration of empty hand and knife skills…

 

Manipulation of the body during the clinch shows just how dangerous an edged weapon can be.

 

Next we looked at the very basic use of an impact tool or stick-like weapon. Here the focus was on pure gross motor skills geared toward our final stress drill of the day were we blended both of the previous modules together i.e. dealing with an edged weapon via the employment of an impact tool. Influence here comes from Bill Kipp’s excellent portal of safety drill, where the object is to get from one end of the training hall to the other, escaping through a simulated exit (portal) to safety.

 

 

The purpose of this drill is really three-fold. First of all it is designed to give each student an introduction into the emotional stress of an adrenal inducing scenario. This objective is met via realistic role-play, dialogue, unpredictable behavior and the introduction of a blade during the interview stage of the scenario.

 

 

The objective of the trainee is to employ a verbal and physical boundary then when the need arises, to pick up a near by training baseball bat and beat the weapon bearing limb of the knife wielding assailant until he drops it, then make your escape through the portal of safety. Now of course the likelihood of conveniently picking up a bat, at the exact moment that a knife is pulled is pretty much next to NOT happening, but that is not the point of the scenario.

 

 

 

 

As well as inducing adrenal stress, it’s important to understanding that what we train for during the emotional stress of a scenario is what we map into the sub-conscious mind, in terms of response for such an event. In other words what you put on the disc is what comes off the disc. If there is to be any chance of you picking up any kind of equalizer during such an event (if of course such an item was available to hand, right at that moment) then you need to practice actually picking it up, in fight and employing it in a Combative sense during emotional stress. This equally applies to the carry, access and deployment of any weapon you might carry as an operative or a civilian, improvised or otherwise. Unless you train it, you won’t do it under stress period.     

 

So practicing picking up and employing a weapon during the portal of safety drill, maps in that response. What’s important to understand is that we do not place any emotional attachment to the bat, or whatever weapon you pick up during such a drill/or any such live situation. If you drop the bat in fight, then the tool has failed you must now branch to another tool, empty hand or whatever. If you attach too much importance to the bat once you’ve dropped it and then try to retrieve it in-fight, you will get tagged, so such a drill will teach you the importance of branching to another skill.

 

 

Finally such a drill will show you just how important it is to stick to gross motor skills, in fact gross motor is the only thing that will work during such conditions, anything else amounts to ineffectual flailing and simply won’t cut it.  Such a drill offers the student training on an accelerated level and was definitely well received at this workshop. 

 

The final module for the day focused on Combative strength training, here we employed two drills pertaining to hand and foot strikes and the body mechanics that power them. Here we worked all aspects of strength concentric/eccentric, isometric and plyometric followed by impact work on the pads. This brought yet another successful workshop to a conclusion.

  

As always thanks to everyone who took part and I hope to see you all next time L.M. Peace….