Monthly Workshop

June 24th     UC workshop review

 

 

     Dealing with Multiple Assailants

On Sunday the 24th of June we held our monthly workshop at the usual venue in Southampton. With a good attendance we started as always with a brief introduction and warm up. From here we moved on to our topic for the day; Dealing with multiple subjects in a violent confrontational sense. We began with a discussion relating to the most essential concepts for countering a multiple threat if avoidance and escape is no longer a viable option. First off pre-emption is the most essential element; you simply must be first and strive to make every shot final. The longer you delay the more likely you are to be fighting on more than one front. Clinical strikes, with the objective of getting the odds (numbers) down quickly are the order of the day.

 

Working priority positioning and the principle of stacking and using one subject to cover from another…

In any multiple subject setting it is numbers alone that give them the advantage, coupled with the pack mentality that this creates, bear in mind that when one attacks, they all attack. It is not like a scene from Fist of Fury, where everyone politely waits their turn, if you wait for the physical to start, it will be immediate and brutal, so hit first and keep hitting to get the numbers down quick, this will also have a massive impact on the pack mentality in a psychological sense, the majority of the time. If you can dispatch one or two of the pack quickly and clinically, with an extremely aggressive and demonstrative demeanor this will often destroy their will to continue on a mental level.  The next major principle of importance is most definitely mobility, where possible mobility allows, you must keep moving. A moving target is harder to track and therefore harder to hit.

 

Here are a few examples of the excellent mobility Zombie drill…                                      

Also we need to bear in mind the tactics employed by multiples, such as flanking (the pincer approach) and triangulation or surrounding the subject from all positions of contact. The counter principle to employ is of course that of flanking or working to the outside of the nearest subject/s. Where possible we must work to the outside as we attack, this keeps multiple subjects in a rough line, allowing us to stack them up and deal with them (at least momentarily) one at a time.  Dispatching three people at once is extremely difficult and dangerous, even if you have great skills but clinically dispatching one at a time via the brief space in time that stacking gives you, is relatively simple enough if you hit fucking hard and have the right mindset.

 

 

Although numbers are against you, it’s extremely important not to weaken your resolve, just as it is when facing weapons or dealing with any threat. The mentality that, ‘’each of you is MEAT and I am fucking starving, applies ten-fold here.  In short, if you are dealing with numbers, you are looking at potential death (lethal force) and that’s without anyone of them bringing a weapon into the equation, therefore you now have the carte blanche to do anything and everything you need to, in order to get out alive! When shown lethal force, you must respond in kind, overwhelmingly! So to re-cap, be pre-emptive, first, ferocious and final; keep moving as you attack, stack the subject’s up and use them for cover etc. Finally support this with the WILL to WIN! In a physical sense, when dealing with multiples it is simply impossible to dictate exactly what hard skill to employ in an A,B,C sense every time you pressure test such a scenario it will of course, be different.

 

Clinch knees to relocation of position….

Therefore you need to stick to the concepts mentioned above as you employ the same basic gross motor tools from the box. In the majority of 2 on 1 and especially 3 on 1 scenarios for example, you will only have time for ONE clinical pre-emptive shot as you engage the first threat, before having to move to a better tactical position and engaging the next.  If you attach to the first subject and continue your assault, what do you think the second or third subject will be doing in that exact moment? So hit and move, making each and every shot count, before engaging the next one. Then as Sun Tzu once said, ‘’keep attacking until the threat subsides!’’ What I’ve just talked about formed the crux of what I wanted to put across to each and every student for the day. The teaching method employed to get this across targeted each of our representational systems, visual through CCTV clips of live multiple incidents, auditory through discussion and lecture and of course kinesthetic through a series of hands on progressive drills. Our two film clips showed first, an example of the pack mentality. Originally posted on a Self-Protection forum by one of my peers from Canada Darren Laur, it showed basically a bunch of chav-like scrots in a garage training on a BOB dummy. What makes it scary is how each one is training in a pre-meditated sinister sense, geared around the dynamics of a brutal street attack on some poor unsuspecting victim. Whether the motive is street robbery, or gratuitous violence for violence sake, these yobs are training to be functional they operate in street clothes, in a darkened environment, from a variety of scenario perspectives. They employ triangulation of the selected target, ambush tactics, deceptive dialogue as they attack from all directions. They also employ the tactic of choking the subject from behind while multiple subjects attack from both frontal and flank simultaneously. This is, as Darren said in his accompanying post, ‘’evidence for use in a murder trial!’’ should any of these yobs actually carry out such an attack. Aside from this is how each of these scrot’s were actually training in state, with imagination and emotional content. This is very functional training, although of course from a criminal perspective there was a lot to learn from this one. The next clip showed a Turkish guy getting attacked by 4-6 guys in a street fight, who to be fair, simply couldn’t get near this guy, he just kept on moving, not allowing himself to get flanked as he punched the head off everything in reach of his clinically fast boxing hands. Great stuff, pre-emption, single gross motor attacks and constant mobility all served to give a visual explanation of the previously said principles in real time.   

 

As always there was a strong emphasis on impact training….

Without going into specifics now, we then spent the rest of the day working on a variety of progressive hands on practical drills, working from a 2 on 1 perspective with lots of clinical impact on kit to get the point across. We then looked at a similar scenario, this time from a confined environment where pre-emption along with subject cover makes itself available as you re-locate your position and stack both subjects as you attack.

  

We also placed an emphasis on peripheral vision, an essential attribute when dealing with numbers…

Next we looked at an excellent mobility drill against 3-4 subjects, with influence here coming from top instructor Nick Hughes’s excellent Zombie drill simply to work the essential principle of working to the outside flank along with making yourself a constant moving target and therefore harder to hit. From here we made this drill progressive before moving on to mass attack (gang related drills) Now the scenario is that you are unfortunate enough to get caught within the confines of a hostile crowd of say ten or more people, there’s commotion everyone is pushing, shoving and hitting everyone. Here your objective is simply damage limitation and escape.

  

Damage limitation during a mass attack drill both standing and grounded…objective here is to cover and escape…

 

 

 

The final section for the day looked at several drills from an ECQ stand up grappling perspective, getting held by one subject as another, attempts to attack etc. From here we wound the day down with a re-cap and debrief and a final scenario drill depicting the best tactics to employ in a numbers against numbers situation, examples included 2 on 2, 2 against 3 and 3 against 2.  Here dirty tactics, pre-emption and the principle of flanking were the order of the day. The scenario employed looked at the situation where you are out with a mate and getting evil looks from two guys at the bar, in this example escape is not possible, so the pre-decided tactic i.e. (before such an event) is that you both simultaneously employ a continuous attack to the first subject as he steps up to interview, dropping him in a blink, you both now turn attention to his mate who will most likely do one of three things; one; freeze up on the spot in which case back up as you both posture then make haste to the exit, or two; back away from you both as quick as he can, in which case the same applies, or three; he will immediately attack one or both of you, in which case you both immediately employ the same explosive continuous attack that just took his mate out of the game seconds earlier. So instead of going 2 on 2 and coming out with a fifty percent chance of winning, you go 2 on 1 then 2 on 1 again giving you both the highest probability of success. There are after all no rules…

  

Depictions of ECQ multiple holding attacks…

  

 

 

 

 

Here is a depiction of the 2 on 2 scenario previously mentioned…

 

All that remains as always is to that all of those who took part a good day was had by all.

Peace L.M