Monthly Workshop

November review

 

 

On Sunday the 26th of November we held our last monthly workshop of the year at the usual venue in Southampton.  With an attendance of about a dozen people we started with our usual introduction and warm up, then straight into our first module which focused on pre-conflict behavior: and body language cues both from a deceptive and aggressive perspective. Here we took a look into the M.O. of a potential street attacker, from the violent opportunist to the career criminal. Gaining an understanding of the precursors to violence is our contextual framework for noticing a threat early enough so that pro-active action can be taken. This module went on to explore the kinds of verbal and non-verbal cues that often precede a criminal assault. It is such cues that present us with a criterion for pre-emption.  The bottom line is being able to spot a potential threat ahead of time will allow you options, varying between avoiding the situation altogether or if necessary to pre-empt at the earliest available opportunity.  Remember it matters little, how combatively efficient you are if you don’t see the threat coming!

 

Here’s one of several training models we used to depict this module.

  

 

This training model depicts a counter measure to the classic pincer approach…

 

 

 

Here Paul takes my attention with a ruse as Alban closes in behind for the assault…

 

 

 

 

Here Patrick depicts a counter measure to the pincer approach. He flanks the mouth keeping both individuals in a line, whilst creating a verbal and physical boundary…

 

 

 

 

 

 

As usual on our workshops we tend to formulate the class from a variety of often unrelated topics, as opposed to a seminar where we tend to work to a specific theme or topic. Today was no different and the next module looked into the specifics of pad work, namely the art of feeding the pads: Here we look at the relationship between the pad-man or feeder and the trainee/striker. We looked at the correct way to feed the pads and at the feeder’s role in general, which should be aimed at installing a multitude of skills into the trainee. These include target acquisition, range finding, transition of varying targets, forward pressure and continuous attack. This employs a classic principle from NLP for accelerated learning, i.e. installing multiple skills within the frame work of a single exercise.                        

 

 

 

Here are some of the lads working a variety of pad drills…

 

 

 

Situational Offence:  Here we looked at specific means of dealing with common unarmed attacks namely shoves and grabs. Of course whenever we find ourselves having to react to something that someone is doing to us, it means that they have initiative and we don’t. This is of course less than ideal, hence the reason we strive for pre-emption but such things must be addressed in training regardless of that.  In most cases our response will be the same that is we will trap and seize one of our assailant’s hands in order to prevent him from getting away from us as we simultaneously counter attack with one or more basic strikes with the other hand/limb.  The thing to bear in mind in all cases is that the grab to your person will precede some kind of strike from your opponent.  With a single grab the most probable attack will be a punch and the two handed grab usually precedes a head butt, a headlock precedes being punched or taken to the ground etc therefore it becomes apparent that our counter attack must be both aggressive and instantaneous.

 

This first picture depicts how you will most likely be grabbed; that is the aggressor will grab a handful of clothing and skin and yolk you up on your toes with in your face aggression. Also any grab will precede an immediate strike, punch or head butt, hence the need for immediate action on your part…

 

  

 

Here my immediate response is to trap and hit simultaneously, followed by barrage of elbows and knees. ..

 

 

 

 

Alban’s counter response to Paul’s Assault…

 

  

 

Dan Morrison and Rob Sizer work their counter grappling skills…

 

 

 

Here Paul demonstrates an excellent eye gouge follow up from the chin-jab…

 

 

Simulation drill design:  Our last module for the day looked in to the formulation of simulation and scenario training. Incidentally I have just finished an in-depth article on this subject so be sure to keep an eye on the website for that. Here we took what we looked at throughout the day, namely M.O. BL cues, situational control, pre-emptive and reactive attacks and placed it into a workable simulation. The training progression starts with learning the said principles and physical gross motor actions. Then the majority of practice comes from impact/pad work with our partner, in order to develop the said skills to an instinctive level and drill them into muscle memory. Then we take the said format and place it within the context of a possible altercation. This starts with simulation practice, where we have a theme to work to incorporating role-play and dialogue, allowing the trainee to put their skills into operation. Here a simulation/scenario takes on a particular theme such as an ATM robbery attempt, or noisy neighbor confrontation or bar bump scenario for example, employing several different outcomes. Now the trainee must add lib according to how events unfold. The feeder will dictate the trainee’s response so a certain degree of pressure is added in order to see what comes out. If mistakes are made then we re-drill until they are corrected this is the whole point of simulation training, to find out what works.

 

 

Unfortunately pictures were thin on the ground at this point needless to say that everyone gave a hundred percent during the padded assailant work and a fine learning experience was had by all…

 

 

 

Cross Training Advice:  We finished the day’s events with a brief discussion on cross training for the Combatives trainee, looking at strength training, hill sprints, interval training etc.

 

               

 

Hill Sprints giving just one depiction of cross training…

 

In addition to regular Combatives training it is highly recommended that you look into additional attribute training, as means to make you the most efficient combat athlete that your genetic pre-disposition will allow. Cross training is a holistic approach to training, which should implement additional areas of combative fitness such as;

 

Strength Training

Plyometrics

ATP drills

Hill sprints

CV work

Boxing

Grappling

 

There was also a brief Q & A at this point bringing the workshop to a close. A good session was had by all. All that remains is for me to thank all my students and participants over the last eight months of successful UC workshops. We will pick up where we left off on the last Sunday of January 2007 hope as always to see some of you back…

 

Peace for Christmas and New Year LM…