Monthly Workshop

October review

 

On Sunday the 29th of October we held our monthly workshop at the usual venue in Southampton. Attendance was good with some 20 plus guys turning up to take part, a few for the first time.

After our initial introduction and overview we started things off with our first module which covered the combative use of neck restraints. Here we looked at a variety of neck restraints as a lower level of force option more for subject control than anything else. We also talked about the specifics of safety and the potential damage that could be inflicted by their use.  In a practical sense we employed both the rear naked choke & the Japanese strangle.

  

Here we look at the nuances between chokes and strangles…This was drilled to a point of understanding then placed into context i.e. controlling the exit of a combative subject via a push/pull to choke/strangle working off the fence…

 

  

Controlling Alban’s exit via the rear naked choke there is also an option here to take him down and control with a knee pin.

 

   

This sequence depicts the medical implications of a rear strangle i.e. cutting off the blood supply to the brain, whilst limiting trauma to the windpipe/trachea. Conversely to that the rear choke compresses the trachea cutting off the oxygen to the brain this can increase the chances of potential permanent danger to the airway.

 

  

 

 

This module continued with a look into a variety of neck restraints including the larynx grab/control and the side strangle. The first is employed as a means to gain compliance via physical force and verbal commands, but also offers an immediate transition to striking via elbows and knees should the level of threat escalate.

 

The larynx grab can also be employed via the push/pull method allowing a chest to back position to control exit.

 

Again there is the option to escalate the level of force via fish hooking, eye gouging or we can just go to strikes from here.

 

 

Here we see the side strangle as a means of intervention taken into an escort hold.

 

Next up was a module on third party intervention, this is where our intention is to remove one person from another during a struggle, maybe intervening to help a colleague within a security setting or simply intervening to protect a significant other. First up we looked at simply running in and cutting the individual down via a Thai kick or knee strike to the low-line. I have personally had great success on multiple occasions with these tactics, taking full advantage of the aggressor’s fixated attention by approaching from the flank/rear and blasting his base out.

 

 

Here we see the Knee and Thai kick intervention…

  

A few of the lads giving it some welly…

 

This tactic or rear intervention continued with the rear face/head control takedown, again attacking from the flank and the rear. Again this is a method tested from experience with great success both for myself and several of my students who work within the field of door security…

 

Here we see the skill preceded by a classic WWII Thunderclap straight into the head control…

 

 

Wherever the head goes the body must follow…

 

The final module for the day looked into the controversial topic of improvised weapons, some like it some don’t, personally I am a subscriber to it, though first to admit the best threat solution is via hard ballistic and immediate impact either with or without a tool, whichever can be employed first in a heartbeat… This module was divided into several phases the first being personal carry…or what you may carry legally on your person on a daily basis. Here we looked at pens… namely a strong metal pen employed as a stabbing implement, also biro pens and pencils which can be thrusted into a target and snapped off inside to aggravate the wound.

 

Multiple attached pen thrusts into the high line via a Tiger’s jab or spiked elbow cover to access and deployment…

 

 

We also looked at the key/s as a slashing tool and the phone and flash light as an impact weapon. In all examples tools were to be integrated with the use of empty hand skills, namely palms, elbows and knees.

 

Here a thick foam pad was held on the thigh as the low line is attacked with a pencil/biro…

 

From here the implement is snapped off in the wound magnifying the injury on a physical and psychological level…

 

The next aspect of this module looked at was the transition from what we carry on our person, to items that we might carry in our car or vehicle such as a trusty 4-6 cell Maglite torch, an ice scraper, socket wrench and a can of de-icer to name just a few. Finally we took a little inspiration from Mick Coup’s excellent street weapons presentation at the last International seminar in Liverpool. Looking at common items employed in a street fight that you might pick up out of a bin or a skip or find in an alley.

 

Here the lads practice integrating short stabs and slashes with a key integrated with palm and elbow strikes, forward pressure and maximum aggression.

 

 

Below the mobile employed as a fast linear strike to the throat preceded by artifice…

 

This is followed immediately with the gross motor action of multiple hammer-fist strikes (cycling) with the said phone.

 

 

Next we applied our same gross motor skills, body mechanics and aggressive mindset to the 4-6 cell Maglite torch followed by the use of common everyday expedient street weapons, namely half a brick, a beer bottle, iron bar and lump of wood. The commonality to the way we strike via a fore hand, back hand and linear motion was emphasized and practiced via partner assisted line drills.

 

Carry and deployment of the 6-cell Maglite torch….

 

 

Applied here during the line drills with maximum aggression and forward pressure…

 

Here we can see common street weapons of opportunity often employed in street fights post nightclub kick out…

Bricks, bottles, iron bar and lumps of wood…

 

 

Line drills employing the Combative use of the brick…

An angular attack, employing the same motion as for our gross motor slap, with half a brick…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally we looked at two handed weapon use via an iron bar or piece of wood. Again commonality to our hard skill strikes, here using the same linear motion as for a straight palm strike impacting with the end of the tool…

 

 

This pretty much brought yet another successful workshop to a close…all that remains, as always is to thank everyone in attendance, also thanks to Neil and Rich for taking all the photos hope to see you all at future events…Peace LM